Lakeside Lutheran High School

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Curriculum

Computer Science
Driver Education
Family & Consumer Science (FACS)
Fine Arts
Language Arts
Mathematics
Physical Education
Science
Social Studies
Technology & Career Education
Word of God
World Languages

ALHSO (Online) Course Offerings

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Courses Descriptions

  * Required to graduate from Lakeside
** College Prep Course

Computer Science

Advanced Programming **
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Advanced Programming is a course in which students better learn to understand structured programming and problem solving using Java. Students thoroughly learn the essential features of Java, understand programming techniques and solve interesting problems. This course, which may lead to advanced placement, is designed for students who consider pursuing a career
in computer programming or computer science. This course is only offered one semester.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Programming and Consent of Instructor
 
Computer Applications **
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course is intended for students who plan to enter an office environment or run their own business after graduation. This course builds on skills learned in Computer Essentials but not covered in the Language Arts curriculum. Applications covered include desktop publishing, presentations (digital, video & paper), spreadsheets and advertising, and gives students insight into entrepreneurship through the development of a business plan with financial aspects.
Prerequisite: Computer Essentials (or equivalent for transfer students)
 
Computer Essentials *
Year | Grade 9; Credit: 1/4 each semester
This course is offered opposite days to Chorus 1.
Computer Essentials 101 *
This course is designed to equip students in the skills of keyboarding, basic google apps usage, online etiquette and how to use those skills to glorify God at Lakeside and beyond. Students learn online research skills, basic programming skills, image editing, presentation creation and video editing. The course, along with Computer Essentials 102, serves as a prerequisite to all computer courses at Lakeside.
 
Computer Essentials 102 *
This course is designed to equip students in the skills of keyboarding, basic computer usage, online etiquette and how to use those skills to glorify God. Students learn Internet and social media etiquette, copyright laws, beginner and intermediate skills in word processing, spreadsheeting, and digital art. The course, along with Computer Essentials 101, serves as a prerequisite to all computer courses at Lakeside.
 
Computer Maintenance
Year | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit 1/2
This course is designed to advance students’ knowledge of the computer and technology in software and hardware areas. The course offers real-life training, organization, inventory and troubleshooting by working with the technology director in a help desk setting. Students also take part in service opportunities connected to technology.
Prerequisite: Must have instructor request and approval of entire faculty
This course can be repeated multiple years.
 
Introduction to Programming **
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Introduction to Programming is a hands–on introductory computer–programming course. Students learn object-based coding for algorithmic thinking, beginning GUI, Python, Visual Basic and MIT App Inventor. This course benefits those students who are logical thinkers and who wish to learn fundamental programming techniques. It also provides a solid foundation for those who are considering taking additional computer programming or computer science courses. This course is offered only one semester and spends 20% of class time on a project that serves as semester exam.
Prerequisites: Computer Essentials and Algebra I
 
Videography Basics
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course is designed to instruct students in planning, creating, and editing digital video. The course covers producing, writing scripts, storyboards, casting, directing, filming techniques, lighting, sound, editing techniques, and publishing. Students create numerous video projects throughout the course with the emphasis of glorifying God and furthering His kingdom.
 
Videography 2
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course is designed to take video skills to the next level. Students will create professional-looking videos to promote LL, the student body, federation churches and schools. From time to time, professional videos may also be made for places of business. The goal is to work on at least one new skill while refining others with each project. Since the course involves making videos that often have strict deadlines, students must show a good work ethic.
Prerequisite: Videography Basics and permission of the teacher
 
Web Page Design 
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit 1/2
This course guides students through a hands–on, step–by–step process of creating an attractive, well–designed website for home, church or enterprise. Students learn web page design and graphics development with many applications to their roles as lifelong disciples of Jesus.
Prerequisite: Computer Essentials
 
 
 

Driver Education

Semester
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
The student studies the relationship of man and the motor vehicle within the traffic environment. Behind–the–Wheel instruction runs concurrently with the classroom instruction and provides students the opportunity for driving experiences in authentic traffic conditions.
Prerequisite: Must be at least 15 1/2 years old to enroll
 
 
 

Family & Consumer Science

Child Development
Semester | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course studies the development of children from pregnancy to age six. Social, emotional, physical, intellectual and spiritual development are considered. Current concerns in the field of child care are explored with professionals from those areas presenting information. Students are involved in projects that deal with normal and problem development. A number of activities lead to working with children in the community to carry out plans developed in class.
 
Foods 1
Semester | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Nutrition and survival in the kitchen are stressed in this course. Major units cover safety, nutrition, preparing simple recipes. Each student is assigned to a kitchen group and works with the group to prepare food, serve, and clean up during labs. Snacks, breakfast foods, and lunch items are emphasized in lab. During the final weeks of the semester, students prepare cookies and candies which they serve during the class exam period.
 
Foods 2: 2A Family Foods & 2B Food Service (offered alternate years)
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
A review of nutrition along with the relationship to current health issues and the economics of foods are stressed as students prepare food from My Plate. Students work with their assigned kitchen to prepare more difficult recipes. During the final weeks of the semester, the class plans and prepares food that is served during the exam period. Foods II alternates emphases from year to year, with a “Family Foods” emphasis, where the class serves a brunch, and “Food Service,” when the class sets up a restaurant.
Prerequisite: Foods 1 or consent of the instructor
 
Sewing 1
Semester | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This beginning sewing course introduces the student to the use and care of the sewing machine and the serger, using a printed pattern and simple construction techniques. Students are required to complete at least two projects, which may be clothing or non–clothing items. Students discuss sewing innovations, pattern flexibility and the economics of sewing. Students supply their own materials.
 
Sewing 2
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Students learn the care and a variety of uses for the serger and sewing machine. Several projects are completed using the serger and sewing machine. Students supply their own materials.
Prerequisite: Sewing 1 or consent of the instructor; May be repeated.
 
 
 

Fine Arts

Art 1 **
Semester | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Art I is a course designed to introduce the elements of art (value, line, shape, color and texture) and the principles of design (space, repetition or pattern, variety and unity, emphasis, rhythm and flow) using a wide variety of media. The course offers a broad introduction to art history showing how past and present artists have used the elements and principles of art.
 
Art 2 **
Semester | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Art II is an extension of Art I, focusing on drawing; specifically perspective and buildings, faces and portraits, still life, shadows and reflections. Most work is done using pencil, charcoal and paper and progresses into other drawing and painting media. It offers a chronological overview of art history focusing on the changes and movements in accepted art styles.
Prerequisite: Art 1
 
Art 3 **
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Art III students explore various mediums, materials and techniques. The course includes, but is not limited to, drawing, painting, commercial and graphic design, sculpture and ceramics. The objective of the course is to increase the cultural interest of the student as an observer and creator of visual art. Prerequisite: Art 2
 
Art, Advanced **
Semester | Grade 11, 12; Credit 1/2
Advanced art builds on a student’s particular interest and ability. This is an individual program of study designed to challenge the student to explore new mediums and develop existing skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: Art 3
 
Band **
Year | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
Lakeside offers an instrumental music program designed to give students experience in music through performance offerings including concert and marching band as well as the opportunity to do solo and small ensemble work. Required performances include sacred and secular concerts and marching at football games and parades. Participation in Wisconsin School Music Association solo and ensemble festival is encouraged. Students may also take part in jazz ensemble, football, volleyball and basketball pep bands, and the summer marching band.
 
A Cappella Choir **
Year | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1
The A Cappella Choir is comprised of juniors and seniors chosen by audition. Members dedicate their efforts toward music of greater difficulty in preparation for concerts, chapel singing and choral presentations in area WELS/ELS congregations. This culminates in the presentation of sacred and secular music that displays the finest talents of the high school singers. All choir members are eligible to participate in the WSMA solo and ensemble contest.
 
Cantate Choir **
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This choir consists of sophomores, juniors and seniors who want to continue singing and/or have greater preparation for A Cappella choir auditions. Required performances include Pops, Easter, and Commencement Concerts, as well as periodic chapel singing. All choir members may also participate in the WSMA solo and ensemble contest. This choir meets daily second semester only.
 
Chorus 1 * **
Year | Grade 9; Credit: 1/4 each semester
Students are introduced to simple 4–part choral harmony, music theory and history. Balance and blend are stressed as the singers prepare for concerts and chapel singing. Required performances include the Christmas, Pops, Easter and Commencement Concerts, as well as periodic chapel singing. All choir members may also participate in the WSMA solo and ensemble contest.
Prerequisite: None
This course is offered opposite days to the Freshman Computer Essentials course.
Students must complete four credits (four years) of English to graduate from Lakeside. Many colleges require four credits of college prep English for admittance.
 
 
 

Language Arts

Students must complete four credits (four years) of English to graduate from Lakeside. Many colleges require four credits of college prep English for admittance.
 
American Literature **
Semester | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course provides a survey approach to selected short stories, poems, novels, and plays by American authors from America’s origin to the 21st Century. Outside reading of novels is
also required.
 
AP English Literature & Composition **
Semester | Grade 12; Credit: 1/2 (Advanced Placement)
This course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. The course prepares students to take the AP exam. Some summer reading is required.
Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation
 
British Literature **
Semester | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
A historical approach to selected works by British authors from Anglo–Saxon times through the 20th Century. Readings include fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, with special consideration given to Shakespearean plays. Outside reading of novels and plays is also required.
 
College Prep English **
Semester | Grade 12; Credit: 1/2
This is a class for college-bound seniors. An emphasis is placed on academic writing, modeled after the types of assignments students may expect in college. The course also includes vocabulary work, some creative writing, the completion of a major research paper, and a multimedia presentation.
Prerequisite: Journalism or Composition
 
Composition *  **
Semester | Grade 11; Credit: 1/2
Emphasis at this level is on the entire composition, stressing the unity of longer essay writing for various purposes. While there is some opportunity for creative writing at previous levels, more emphasis and opportunity for creativity is provided in this course. Grammar principles and skills are further developed from previous levels. A longer, documented research paper is required.
 
English 9 * **
Year | Grade 9; Credit: 1
Students work on achieving competency in writing, starting with basic sentence structure and moving to paragraph unity and stylistic variety, working towards putting together essays and a short research paper. To achieve this purpose, grammatical concepts are reviewed and introduced and reading assignments serve as a catalyst for many writing topics. Genres covered include the short story, essays and nonfiction, as well as drama, poetry, the novel, and the epic. Outside reading is also assigned throughout the year-long course.
 
English 10 * ** 
Year | Grade 10; Credit: 1
Students learn to carefully and closely read literature from a variety of sources: folktales, non-fiction, short story, poetry, drama, and the novel, including western traditional classics. Course focuses on the relationship between writers’ lives, contexts, and writing. Use of literary terms and devices is refined. Outside reading is assigned. Writing emphasizes creating sound paragraphs and combining them into longer compositions. A research paper is expected. Grammatical concepts are reviewed throughout the semester, as students frequently respond to the literature in their writing. Introductory elements of public speaking are also covered later in the year-long course.
Prerequisite: English 9
 
Foundations of English
Year | Grade 9; Credit: 1
Students with academic weakness in the area of English and students with special needs are advised to take this course after consultation with the student’s parents, grade school principal, and appropriate Lakeside personnel. Fundamental components of the course deal with sentence writing, basic grammatical concepts, comprehension strategies, and individualized reading assistance. The course is also designed to offer instruction and guidelines for study habits and skills that apply to all classes.
 
Journalism **
Semester | Grade 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Journalism is an advanced level, college prep, composition course. Students study news gathering, interviewing techniques, news writing, editorial writing and feature writing. Students also read and critically examine print and electronic media. Students also learn to use Adobe Photoshop and InDesign, create and design yearbook pages, tell stories through pictures, and create issues of the student newspaper. Course is limited to 20 students per semester.
Prerequisite: English 9, English 10 and instructor consent
 
Responses to Literature
Semester | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
A variety of literature genres is explored. Award-winning literature is a point of focus with students exploring the significance of theme and content in appeal to young people and influence on their thinking.
 
Speech * **
Semester | Grade 11; Credit 1/2
Speech fundamentals explores and practices the practical aspects of communication and its impact on everyday living. Particular emphasis is placed on organizing and delivering the speech. Students write and deliver seven to eight different speeches while also working to improve listening and interpersonal skills.
 
Vocational English
Semester | Grade 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Intended for the non–college bound student, this course places the student into situations which confront him or her as a part of the country’s work force. Resume completion, letter writing, report writing, and basic usage reviews are included in the study.
 
World Literature **
Semester | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course introduces students to authors and works from around the world, emphasizing works that are not American or British. The readings consist of novels, a non-fiction work, and selected short stories. Attention is also given to the culture of the areas studied. Written papers or presentations accompany each major work.
 
 
 

Mathematics

Students must complete three credits (three years) of mathematics to graduate. Most colleges require three credits of mathematics including Algebra I (Algebra 1A and 1B), Geometry and Algebra II-Trigonometry.
 
Algebra I **
Year | Grades 9, 10, 11; Credit: 1
This course thoroughly presents the basic concepts of algebra. Topics include real numbers, algebraic expressions, algebraic properties, linear equations and inequalities, graphing, functions, linear systems, exponents, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, radicals, probability, data analysis and problem solving. Incoming freshmen may test out of this course.
 
Algebra IA ** 
Year | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This course is designed for students who require algebra but may have difficulty handling Algebra I in one year. The year-long course presents the concepts of the first semester of Algebra, clearly and slowly, giving students ample time for understanding and practice. Topics include the real numbers, algebraic expressions and properties, linear and inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing, functions, and problem solving.
 
Algebra IB ** 
Year | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This course reinforces concepts from Algebra IA and then continues to include graphing, functions, exponents, quadratic equations, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions, radicals, connections to geometry, probability and statistics, and problem solving. Algebra IA and Algebra IB together form a 2-year course covering all topics of a regular Algebra I course, with additional reinforcement in math skills. Algebra IA and Algebra IB together are considered one college prep unit for mathematics.
Prerequisite: Algebra IA
 
Algebra II - Trigonometry **
Year | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This course further develops the concepts of algebra with emphasis on linear functions, linear inequalities, linear systems, matrices, quadratic functions, factoring, polynomial functions, rational exponents, radical functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, rational functions, quadratic relations, conic sections, counting methods, probability, data analysis, statistics, sequences, series and problem solving. The algebra portion of this course is designed to be 1-1/2 semesters in length. The 1/2 semester trigonometry portion includes the study of trigonometric ratios, functions, graphs and identities. This course is required by some colleges for admission. Prerequisite: Geometry
 
AP Calculus **
Year | Grade 12; Credit: 1 (Advanced Placement)
This course is a Calculus AB Advanced Placement course and may be taken for both high school and college credit. The course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, arithmetic geometry, trigonometry and analytic geometry. This course prepares students to take the AP exam.
Prerequisite: Precalculus
 
Consumer Math
Year | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1
This practical course deals with mathematical applications in everyday life and business. Topics covered for managing personal finances include income, expenses, budgeting, banking, insurance, investing, credit, loans, income taxes, and vehicle and housing costs. Topics covered for managing business finances include personnel costs, purchasing, inventory, sales, marketing, services, basic accounting, and financial management. This course is geared primarily for students who may not pursue a 4-year college degree. Those who have taken Algebra II / Trigonometry or beyond must receive consent of the instructor.
 
Geometry **
Year | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This course covers the definitions, properties, theorems and proofs of geometry. Topics include inductive and deductive reasoning, quadrilaterals, angle and line relationships, congruent triangles, similar polygons, circles, area, volume, construction and loci, and coordinate geometry.
 
Pre-algebra 
Year | Grade 9; Credit: 1
This course is intended for students who may profit from a comprehensive review of mathematical skills and have little background in pre-algebra concepts. Pre-algebra concepts are introduced in preparation for Algebra 1.
 
Precalculus **
Year | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1
The main purpose of this course is to help prepare students for college level calculus. Several of the topics studied include linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, logarithms, trigonometry, parametric and polar equations, vectors, conics, and calculus.
Prerequisite: Algebra II–Trigonometry
 
 
 

Physical Education

Boys’ and Girls’ Physical Education *
Year | Grade 9; Credit: 1
The physical education 9 curriculum directs the student into lifetime fitness through aerobic sports activities as well as muscular strength and endurance improvement. Basic skills and knowledge of various sport games are taught. Students are introduced to the correct techniques of strength training as part of overall physical fitness. The curriculum includes lifetime fitness activities of aerobics, weight training, and circuit training. Sports activities include units on lacrosse, speedball, volleyball (boys), team handball, field hockey, eclipse ball, Ultimate Frisbee, pickle ball, badminton, a variety of indoor games, rugby, disc golf, whiffle ball and coed line dancing. Class meets five days a week. Except for line dancing, the class is not coed.
 
Fit 4 Life 
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course is a more competitive fitness and exercise class based on improving the five components of health-related fitness. Students are involved in a fitness program that includes cardiovascular, flexibility and muscular improvement along with body composition testing. The daily schedule includes aerobic activities involving team sports, games, or workout videos as well as strength and flexibility training for muscular improvement. Students are allowed the use of a variety of fitness equipment (ellipticals, treadmills, and bikes), as well as free and machine weights. (Workout videos of yoga, Tae Bo, Pilates, aerobic dance steps and walking are also available.) The class is for female and male students interested in exercise, fitness and personal improvement with an emphasis in a sports or competitive coed setting. Class meets 5 days a week and may be taken multiple semesters. Students may not take both types of fitness classes during the same semester.
  
 
Health *
Semester | Grade 10; Credit 1/2
This is a one semester course that includes topics concerned with general mental, emotional and physical health. Content is related to the perspective of the high school age group, yet it also aims to promote effective and long term health habits that can be carried out through adulthood.
 
Strength & Conditioning (boys)
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course is based on the Lakeside Strength/Speed (BFS) program and includes strength training through lifting weights, flexibility work, plyometric training and speed development. Class meets five days a week: three days of weight training and two days of speed development. Class is graded on attendance, effort, lifting technique, spotting technique, and improvement in speed, flexibility and strength. This class is for both athletes and non-athletes who are serious about improving strength and speed. This course for boys is offered both semesters and can be taken multiple semesters.
 
Strength Training (girls)
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course is based on the Lakeside Strength/Speed (BFS) program and includes strength training through lifting weights, flexibility work, plyometric training and speed development. Class meets five days a week: three days of weight training and two days of speed development. Class is graded on attendance, effort, lifting technique, spotting technique, and improvement in speed, flexibility and strength. This class is for both athletes and non-athletes who are serious about improving strength and speed. This course for girls is offered both semesters and can be taken multiple semesters.
 
 
 
Science
Members of the class of 2019 and 2020 must complete two credits (two years) of science to graduate from Lakeside. Students in the class of 2021 and following must complete three credits (three years) of science to graduate from Lakeside. Regardless, many colleges require three credits of science for admittance, including chemistry or physics.
 
Anatomy and Physiology **
Year | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1
A college prep course, human anatomy and physiology takes an in-depth look at the structure and function of the human body.. Through the topics discussed in this class, students grow in their understanding of the human body and their appreciation for the Creator. Activities such as full-scale mapping of the body and mammalian dissection reinforce topics presented and discussed in class.
Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry (completion or concurrent enrollment.)
 
Biology * **
Year | Grade 10; Credit: 1
Biology provides an opportunity to develop an appreciation for and understanding of God’s living creation. This course covers numerous aspects of organisms in the biosphere. Specifically, the course focuses on the incredible diversity of known organisms as well as the function and interaction of these organisms. Stewardship concepts concerning the living creation are stressed through an ecological, activity-based course including many hands-on labs and dissection of selected organisms.
 
Chemistry **
Year | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1
A college prep course, chemistry provides an opportunity to study various aspects of the atomic nature of creation such as atomic and molecular kinetic theory, gas laws, phases of matter, ions and solutions. Concepts are reinforced through a variety of lab activities.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Physical Science and Biology courses. Students must possess a mathematical ability to calculate ratios and multiply and divide fractions, decimals, numbers with exponents, and decimals.
 
Earth Science **
Semester | Grades 11, 12; Credit 1/2
Earth Science includes topics such as astronomy and the earth’s geology, weather, oceans and resources. Course content focuses on the real life environment of students and has many applications to their daily lives.
Next available in 2019-20. Offered every year thereafter.
Prerequisites: General Science and Biology
 
Environmental Science **
Semester | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Environmental science is a study of the sustainability of ecosystems with emphasis on the resources of soil, air and water. Activities are used to reinforce ecological concepts. Stewardship of the creation is stressed throughout the course.
This course is offered in rotation with Earth Science (available 2018-19 and every other year).
Prerequisite: Biology
 
General Science * **
Year | Grade 9; Credit: 1
An introduction to physics and chemistry, using various laboratory experiences this course investigates the behavior of the physical Creation. Topics such as motion, energy, atomic structure, solutions, and magnetism explore the nature and behavior of matter and energy.
 
Physics **
Year | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1
A college prep course, physics provides an opportunity to study various aspects of matter and energy such as mechanics, properties of matter, heat, sound, light, and atomic and nuclear physics. Problem-solving skills are developed throughout the course through a variety of lab activities.
Prerequisites: Physical Science, Biology, and Enrollment in or completion of Algebra II
 
 
 

Social Studies

Students must complete three credits (three years) of social studies to graduate from Lakeside.
 
American Government * **
Semester | Grade 12; Credit: 1/2
U.S. Government surveys the institutions of American democracy as they have developed from 1776 to the present with special emphasis on an examination of the Constitution as the basis of our form of democracy.
 
AP Psychology **
Year | Grade 12; Credit: 1
A college-level course designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. This course prepares students to take the AP Psychology exam.
 
Eastern Geography **
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Students explore geography to deepen and enrich their understanding of the nations, peoples and customs of the eastern hemisphere extending from Cyprus in southwest Asia across to Japan in East Asia and from North China to aboriginal Australia south to Antarctica. Emphasis is also on God’s creation and preservation of the unique heritage, diverse customs and beliefs of the peoples of this mystic area of the world. Yemen caravans, a Hajj to Mecca, Hindu burial customs, prayer wheels at Buddhist temples, the Dalai lama, a Tibetan Sherpa, monsoon Asia, the aboriginal outback beliefs and traditions, and the ice cliffs of Antarctica are a sampling of the unique landscape and mystic customs that are studied.
Eastern and Western Geography are independent courses and either one or both can be taken.
 
Economics **
Semester | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Economics covers the basics of economic systems, economic theory, how economic forces have helped shape events of the past and present. The course will help build a basic foundation for students to use in sociopolitical, business, and personal economics.
 
Financial Literacy *
Semester | Grade 12; Credit: 1/2
Financial Literacy is designed to equip and empower students with the necessary information to prepare them for a life of responsible Christian Stewardship in the 21st century. This course teaches students how to build a solid foundation for their financial future by exploring a basic foundation of “money matters” for students to use in money management and personal economics. This is a required Senior course. It is not part of the required Social Studies courses, but is taught by the department..
 
U.S. History * **
2 Semesters | Grade 11 or 12; Credit: 1/2 per semester
U.S. History is a survey of the political, social, cultural, economic and religious development of the United States. Special emphasis is given to social, economic and religious trends that unify and define the unique American experience. 2 Semesters must be taken by juniors to fulfill graduation requirements.. Seniors(or juniors) may take a third semester as an elective. The three semester courses each cover a unique time period. The courses are as follows:
 
U.S. History — Foundations
Semester | Credit: 1/2
Covers the time period from North American colonization to the 1840’s.
 
U.S. History — 1850–1920
Semester | Credit: 1/2
Covers the time period from the Antebellum period (1850s) until WW I.
 
U.S. History — Modern era
Semester | Credit: 1/2
Covers the time period from the 1920s until the present.
 
Western Geography **
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Students explore geography to deepen and enrich their understanding of the nations, peoples and customs of the western hemisphere and Africa, including the North and South American continents, the Caribbean world, Europe, the Russian Republics and Africa. Emphasis is also on God’s creation, preservation, and blessings placed upon the diversity of these nations and how change has made many of these countries world powers today. Amazon Indians, Mayan ruins, Peruvian Machu Picchu, famous rivers of Europe, frozen Lake Baikal, the Trans Siberian Railroad, yurts, dachas, banyas, Mt. Kilimanjaro, AIDS in Africa, the Masai, the fight against terrorism, urban sprawl, the five pillars of Islamic faith, and purdah are a sampling of the cultural and physical landscape that is studied.
Eastern and Western Geography are independent courses and either one or both can be taken.
 
World History * **
Year | Grades 9, 10; Credit: 1
Our study of World History begins with a general survey of ancient civilizations that God used in the preservation of his chosen people and the preparation of the world for the Savior from sin. We later study those people and nations that have had the greatest impact on Western Civilization with special attention given to the growth and spread of Christianity. In addition, modern day world maps are learned to help students understand the world in which they live and to help them succeed in upper level social studies courses in the future.
 
 
STEM Academy; PLTW/Engineering
There is an application process for acceptance into Academy, additional course fee required. 2nd semester enrollment is contingent on satisfactory first semester performance.

Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) **
Year | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
IED is a project-based learning class using the curriculum from Project Lead the Way (PLTW). This nationally-acclaimed curriculum uses technology tools to solve real-life problems. This course uses 3D solid-modeling software, sketching, and design techniques to solve proposed problems. Students learn the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, engineering standards, technical documentation and are introduced to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) careers. This class is designed for freshmen to take concurrently with required math and science classes (Class limit: 24). Remaining positions will be filled by sophomores through seniors. Prerequisite: STEM Academy acceptance.
 
 

Technology & Career Education

Advanced Career Tech
Semester | Grade 12; Credit: 1/2
Designed as a senior level course for a student who has completed Woods 2 and Metals Technology to continue to advance skills in serving Lakeside and the Tech Ed department in the construction and repair of projects around the campus. Students help engineer better solutions to problems and are encouraged to be self-motivated and exhibit a strong work ethic.
Required: Completion with at least a “B” in Woods 2 and Metals, or instructor approval
 
Agriculture Survey 
Semester | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Explores areas of agriculture as it relates to food and fiber being produced on a local level but marketed on a global level. This is an applied science class where students complete projects involved from landscape design and plant growth, to comparing livestock and small animals. Students create food products that look at crops, hydroponics and soils. They also explore natural resources with fish taxidermy and land management and leadership opportunities of the FFA.
 
CAD 
Semester | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This is an introductory level course in graphic communications and CAD (Computer Aided Drafting and Design). The course allows students to evaluate their talents in mechanical drafting. Students sketch, design and draw working drawings used in industry on CAD software. Students are also introduced to 3–D drawing and 3-D printing. CAD software is used to complete much of the class work.
 
CAD 2
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
This course builds on the introductory CAD course. It stresses more detailed mechanical and small model drawings. Approximately nine weeks will stress architectural planning and design, including basic home planning, technical architectural drafting and design, with a 3D CAD remodeling project of a kitchen.
Prerequisite: CAD
 
Construction Trades
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Students evaluate their interest and talents in construction and home improvement. Some example units include framing walls, floors and trusses along with plumbing, drywall and electricity. Projects may include working with concrete, building outdoor furniture, small sheds or student-designed projects.
 
Metals Technology
Semester | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Jump into the area of manufacturing where students will use arc, wirefeed (MIG)and TIG welders. Fabricate projects using a plasma cutter and torch. Skills in using sheet metal, forging, heat treating, the metal lathe and vertical mill are also developed to make projects. Skills learned with help students to explore careers related to not only technical degrees but STEM careers (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math).
 
Small Engines
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Students learn how a 2 cycle engine compares to a 4 cycle as they disassemble, repair and reassemble an engine as they troubleshoot its operation. Topics include: electronics, small engine maintenance, alternative energy sources/fuels, compression, etc.
 
Woods 1
Semester | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Students learn the fundamentals of safe use of hand and machine tools in working with a variety of types of woods and materials. The semester project is to design and build either a game board/table or sofa mate (table), or keepsake box. Use the CNC router to create a project. Skills learned may help in the home, as a hobby or even a career in the construction, carpentry, engineering or woodworking industry.
 
Woods 2 – cabinets
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Woods 2 builds off the skills learned in Woods 1 in dealing with Wood Technology. Students continue to operate equipment safely in the design and completion of a cabinet project or octagon clock or comparable instructor approved project. Continue to utilize the CNC router and Sketchup for drawing plans.
Prerequisite: Woods 1
 
Woods 3 – Furniture
Semester | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1/2
Students design and build a project of their choice given space and skills of craftsmanship. Examples include: entertainment center, table, hutch, and are only limited to the creativity of blueprint-reading skills. Skills learned may help in the home, as a hobby or even a career in the construction, carpentry, engineering or woodworking industry.
Prerequisite: Woods 2
 
 
 

Word of God

Students are required to study the Word of God each semester they attend Lakeside in order to graduate.
 
Religion 9 *
Year | Credit: 1
A survey course in the Old Testament entitled “God’s Grace in the Old Testament” is presented using Christ Light materials. The course shows the undeserved kindness of YAHWEH (the Lord) in the Old Testament time of grace and demonstrates how God’s gracious action points to the coming Messiah.
 
Old Testament: Genesis to Deuteronomy *
Semester, Credit: 1/2
 
Old Testament: Joshua to Malachi *
Semester, Credit: 1/2
 
Religion 10 *
Two classes are offered for Religion 10. Both classes are required and semester assignments are made according to the class schedule.
 
Gospels *
Semester, Credit: 1/2
An overview of the life of Jesus, the Messiah, using the four Gospels. This course consists of nine units thematically developed to teach spiritual truths and adapt spiritual attitudes and habits from the four gospel accounts of Jesus’ life. Each unit contains three themed lessons. Each lesson contains a Bible study guide with application exercises and activities. Spiritual journaling is used to reflect a growing spiritual life in Jesus.
 
Acts and Epistles *
Semester, Credit: 1/2
This 10th grade course follows the development of the New Testament Christian Church after the Ascension of Christ. The book of Acts is used as the source for the historical background. The Pauline Epistles are studied in chronological order. Application to today’s church is emphasized. Students are encouraged to not only grow in their faith, but share their faith outside of these four walls of school.
 
Religion 11 *
Two classes are offered for Religion 11. Both classes are required and semester assignments are made according to class schedule.
 
Revelation and World Religions *
Semester, Credit: 1/2
Students take a detailed look at the book of Revelation, growing in their conviction that the Lord is in charge of the present and future. Students are then introduced to a study of world religions where they learn the difference between their faith and other faiths, with the goal of being able to reach out more effectively with the Gospel.
 
Christian Doctrine *
Semester, Credit: 1/2
This course reviews the principal doctrines of the Christian Church. The truths of
Scripture are then applied to the daily life of the student. Selected teachings are discussed with intent to offer the student sufficient instruction so that he or she is able
to distinguish between the sound teachings of the Bible and false teachings of men.
 
Religion 12 *

Apologetics *
Semester, Credit: 1/2
This study of Christian apologetics equips students with Biblical responses to the challenges that await their faith in the secular world. Topics include the trustworthy nature of Jesus Christ, the Bible, atheism, the problem of evil, evolution, postmodernism and evangelism.
 
Christian Living *
Semester, Credit: 1/2
Students explore God’s Word on relationships with special emphasis on marriage and family. Students gain a greater appreciation for God’s instructions on family, love, marriage and sexuality.
 
 
 

World Languages

Students planning to attend college are advised to study at least two credits (two years) of a world language in order to fulfill admittance requirements. A grade of C- or higher is required to advance to the next level.
 
German 1 **
Year | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This course serves as an introduction to the basic skills of German language communication. Emphasis is placed on language as speech. However, students are also required to read and write elementary German. Activities include vocabulary study, grammar study, playing language games and singing German songs.
 
German 2 **
Year | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This course builds upon the basics of the German language and culture learned in German I. Activities include vocabulary and grammar study, conversation, singing songs, reading stories, presenting skits and writing to German-speaking pen pals. Students may also take the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) national test. Emphasis is on the use of German in the classroom. More instruction is done in German and students make greater effort to use German in the classroom.
Prerequisite: German 1
 
German 3 **
Year | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1
An intermediate study of the German language and culture continues through the use of speaking and listening exercises, language games, German magazines and students produce a video skit as a culminating activity (time permitting). Students may also take the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) national test. This course is taught primarily in German and students are also expected to speak in German. The course includes required outside reading in German.
Prerequisite: German 2
 
German 4 **
Year | Grade 12; Credit: 1
This course deals with advanced conversation in the German language with emphasis on listening, speaking, writing, reading comprehension and grammar reviews. Students also study contemporary German history using 2 movies, Good Bye Lenin and Die Weisse Rose. A variety of materials are used and students produce a video skit as a culminating activity. Students may also take the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) national test. This course is taught primarily in German and students are also expected to speak in German; it also includes a comprehensive review of grammar.
Prerequisite: German 3
 
Latin 1 **
Year | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This course begins a study of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language.
 
Latin 2 **
Year | Grades 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This course continues the basic grammar and syntax skills learned in Latin I.
Prerequisite: Latin 1
 
Spanish 1 **
Year | Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; Credit: 1
This is an introductory course to the Spanish language and its culture. Students develop a novice proficiency in the language through a variety of communicative activities that focus on the four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students also develop awareness of Hispanic culture and what this means to them as young Christians.
 
Spanish 2 **
Year | Grades 10, 11, 12: Credit: 1
Spanish II continues the study of the four basic communication skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students continue to enhance their proficiency in the Spanish language through vocabulary and grammar study, conversation, language games, songs and reading a Spanish magazine.
Prerequisite: Spanish 1
 
Spanish 3 **
Year | Grades 11, 12; Credit: 1
Students increase their proficiency to an intermediate level using the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students converse more easily and readily with their advanced understanding of the grammar and vocabulary. In this course, students are responsible for a variety of projects and presentations all completed in Spanish. This course is taught in Spanish and students are required to use only Spanish in the classroom.
Prerequisite: Spanish 2
 
Spanish 4 **
Year | Grade 12; Credit: 1
Students continue to develop intermediate proficiency in the Spanish language. Spanish IV focuses on Spanish literature, using stories, poems, songs and other types of literature to extend knowledge. This course assumes students have been adequately prepared for the coursework. Students are required to make presentations, write essays and read longer stories in Spanish. This course is taught in Spanish and students are required to use only Spanish in the classroom.
Prerequisite: Spanish 3
 
 
 

Online Course Offerings

 ALHSO is another means our “Area Lutheran High Schools (Online)” use to carry out the Lord’s directive to nurture and do outreach. The online series of courses are designed and taught from a Scriptural perspective. Every opportunity is used to strengthen those who are Christians and reach out to those who do not as yet know and believe that Jesus is their Savior. This online education program provides high schools that comprise the ALHS with the opportunity to work together by sharing courses and instructors, and thus make the unity even stronger. For current info on next year’s offerings, go to www.alhso.org

Online Learning

In addition to our full range of course selections, Lakeside participates in our Area Lutheran High Schools (ALHS) online learning system. These online credit course are taught by various active and retired teachers within the WELS high school system. See course descriptions at the end of the LLHS face-to-face course descriptions on this page.
 
Interested students/families can also go to the course access site here.